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KINDLY DONATED BY LIZ STEEVES OF USA

(SummaCloud at aol.com)

 

The author of this book, Francis Yelland, was born at Court Mills, St.Stephen in Brannel, Cornwall in 1823, the youngest of 20 children. He emigrated to USA in 1845.

 

 

 

 

THE

 

EXILE'S LAY:

 

 

VALEDICTORY TO THE LAND OF HIS BIRTH

 

AND SALUTATORY TO THAT OF

 

HIS ADOPTION:

 

AND

 

OTHER POEMS.

 

 

BY THE BORDER MINSTREL.

 

 

Francis Yelland

 

 

BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY JAMES FRENCH & Co.,

 

78 WASHINGTON STREET.

 

1855.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ii

 

Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1855, by

 

JAMES FRENCH & CO.,

 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of
Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

iii

 

 

PREFACE

 

 

A stranger, having voluntarily sacrificed home with its early friendships, ties of kindred and love of country at the shrine of freedom, by crossing the Atlantic, and settling down among your hills and vales as an American citizen, bringing (though small and insignificant the offering) his purse, his hands, an unsullied name, and habits of honest industry, to the feet of Columbia, now tremblingly offers for her acceptance the first fruits of his humble muse.

In justice to himself, it may be proper for the author to state, that many of these poems are juvenile efforts, and that the first three were composed amid constant interruptions and other discouraging circumstances, during a portion of last winter's leisure hours.

In the longer poem, while giving vent to national feelings, and sometimes using strong language, it has been his study to excite the admiration, rather than the jealousy of Americans toward their mother country.

The design of the author in exposing, in this country, the faults of England, (in the second part) is to foster in the minds of other Anglo-adopted citizens a feeling of duty toward the country of their birth; that they may echo back the songs of Columbian Freedom, and contribute what

they can to relieve Britian from the evils that have too long existed there. English liberals are doing much; but they have much to contend with, and their progress is slow; and if any who have escaped those evils can assist them, and share the honors they are winning, it should be their pleasure to do so.

The language used toward the aristocracy may be severe, but it would be well if there were less truth and justice and more poetry in it. There are however, good, honest and humane individuals among them; if honesty and goodness be compatible with the tacit support of such a dislocated system of society.

The tribute paid to the country of his adoption (in the third part) is sincere and involuntary, but he would that time had enabled him to have made it more worthy of the glorious theme which his humble muse has attempted to sing.

The whole is designed to show that, while the foreign-born citizen forgets not the land of his birth, (and who can,) he still can love and appreciate the country of his adoption; and aid in making the two great Anglo-Saxon nations better acquainted with each other, that the Old may emulate the New, and strengthen the common ties of language, literature and brotherhood.

Lincoln, Me., Apr. 25th, 1855.

 

 

 

 

TO A FOND MOTHER AND A

KIND AND INDULGENT FATHER,

WHO ARE NOW SLUMBERING FAR

AWAY BENEATH THE SHADE OF THE OLD

GRAY TOWER; AND WHOSE UNCLOGED SPIRITS

MAY BE HOVERING NEAR THEIR WANDERING

CHILD, AND SYMPATHIZING IN HIS FATE,

THIS LITTLE VOLUME IS DUTIFULLY

AND AFFECTIONATELY DEDI-

CATED, BY THEIR SON,

 

                                         THE AUTHOR.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

THE EXILE'S LAY   Part First.

THE EXILE'S LAY   Part Second.

THE EXILE'S LAY   Part Third.

THE INDIAN,-- A FRAGMENT

BUSINESS AND RETIREMENT

KOSSUTH'S ADDRESS to the Northern Despots

TRIBUTE to the American Soldiers who fell in the Mexican War

SHINE ON MY PATH AGAIN, Star of my Soul

KATIE FARRE

I FOUND A FAIR MAIDEN

LINES on visiting a young and fair Niece on her death bed

THE BEREAVED AND FRENZIED MOTHER

THE MOTHER'S ROSE, an Allegory

'TIS SUNSHINE wherever thou art

THE MOTHER'S lament for her child

LITTLE MAIMIE

COME TO ME

STANZAS on the death of a pious brother

FAREWELL TO MY NATIVE COT

STANZAS, written after having been five weeks at sea

STANZAS

THE ABSENT LOVER

THE SHEPHERD BOY'S MIDNIGHT SONG

SONG OF THE INSANE MAIDEN

LINES TO A YOUNG LADY after her recovery from a severe and sudden illness

AN IMPROMPTU,

STANZAS ON SEEING A LOVELY GIRL LOOKING SAD

LINES ON THE DEATH OF MY MOTHER

THE COMPLAINT OF THE VOLUNTARY EXILE

STANZAS TO -------

STANZAS to Miss G-------

OUR BLUE-EYED BOY

CARDIGAN'S ADDRESS TO HIS BRIGADE

ART THOU A FORM OF EARTH!

STANZAS

 

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